Tag Archives: Orphanage

Martine L. Nolletti, Chairman of Cornerstone Project Incorporated, Strives to Assist Underprivileged Women and Children in Africa

Martine NollettiWhen Martine L. Nolletti met the co-founder of Cornerstone Project Incorporated, a native Kenyan, she felt compelled to give back to the women and children of Kenya. Currently serving as the chairman for the nonprofit organization, she assists in providing education for AIDS orphans in Kenya. In her position, Ms. Nolletti oversees all daily business operations and logistics. This includes orchestrating education and housing for children orphaned by the AIDS pandemic in Northwest Kenya. Currently, Cornerstone Project Incorporated is working diligently to construct a boarding school in the area which will house and teach both orphaned and tuition paying students. Seeking to minimize annual operating costs, they will rely partially on charitable donations to maintain the institution. Ever eager to bring awareness to this cause, and receive additional donations, Ms. Nolletti also handles fundraising, business development, and design in pursuit of ecological sustainability for Cornerstone Project Incorporated. Attributing her success to collaborating with and listening to others, she plans to raise money to open a vocational high school and conference center for adult education.

As with most journeys, Ms. Nolletti’s journey for personal empowerment lead her to the absolute and resolute desire to assist others in  achieving their own empowerment, especially where these challenges are the greatest: for the children of the poorest of the poor, living in the worst of circumstances. This is how she began her journey and where she found her own peace in the process. Ms. Nolletti feels that she has been blessed with good health and good fortune along the way and it has been a great gift to assist others in flourishing.

Martine L. Nolletti pushes to help orphaned children in Kenya by providing for them opportunities for advancement

Martine L. Nolletti pushes to help orphaned children in Kenya by providing for them opportunities for advancement

It has been Ms. Nolletti’s observation that many well-intended projects in the philanthropic arena fail, and she has come to some conclusions as to why. “Many projects are taken on from a ‘missionary’ ideology,” she says, “and imply that the group being served does not have the sovereign capability to manage themselves. This smacks of the colonialist mentality that has decimated entire cultures for millennia. My approach is to provide assistance to an area or a project where the change is sought after by the group themselves, organically and with respect to that areas culture. Women and children are at the heart of my philanthropic pursuits as they have been most largely marginalized globally.”

“Another area I have observed that maligns the philanthropic arena is the paradoxical ego attachment on the part of the philanthropist. This produces control issues that typically strangle a project before it even gets out of the gates. I try to assume all projects have nothing to do with me…because they don’t really. That has been the key to my success.”

Ms. Nolletti is professionally affiliated with US Green Building Council. Away from the demands of her work, she enjoys Yoga, gardening, traveling, architecture, and interior design.

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Dr. Kathleen Walk Established a Nonprofit that Spreads the Word of God and Heals People Physically and Spiritually

f0142aa996a34a9f849ae776dc95a07cDr. Kathleen Walk is the founder and executive director of Hope International Services, a nonprofit organization that promotes Christian missionary endeavors, with an emphasis on planting churches through healing crusades, and training Christians and their leaders using international radio and short-term ministry. H.I.S.’ goal is to provide health and human services to all underserved people in the world.

Dr. Walk was inspired to get involved in this type when she was sitting in church with her mother and heard a missionary doctor speak of how she was able to remove a tumor from someone when no other doctor would. At 7 years old, Dr. Walk knew what he career path would be. Beginning her career in 1968, Dr. Walk earned an MD from the University of Nebraska Medical Center. After working for two years in Omaha, Nebraska, as a physician, she spent the next 10 years practicing as a medical doctor and missionary overseas.

Dr. Walk has long been committed to healing and teaching the word of God. She hosts a weekly radio show that is heard in 180 countries, and has served as a physician in developing countries, including Nigeria and Bangladesh. Dr. Walk did volunteer relief work in Nigeria during the Nigerian-Biafran war, from 1969 to 1970, and was the director of a new hospital that opened in Nigeria in 1999.

gfhfgIn 2004, Dr. Walk built an orphanage in Malawi. The orphanage now cares for hundreds of children whose parents have perished, either from AIDS, starvation or war. H.I.S. provides these children with food, water, shelter, clothes, blankets, supervision, education, and most of all, hope.  Dr. Walk has also established new churches in Africa and Russia, developed a rural health program in Bangladesh, and built hospitals for the elderly in Bangladesh and Nigeria. Additionally, Dr. Walk has traveled to Pakistan twice and established a primary school for disenfranchised children there in 2011. She will soon be returning to Pakistan to teach men and women how to work together.

Dr. Walk has published her poetry with Cambridge of England, and is currently working on her third book, an autobiography titled “Beyond Abundance.” Her writing is published under her pen name, Kathy A. Bliese.

For more information about Hope International Services, visit http://www.hopeinternationalservices.org.

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Geraldine Cox Operates a Home for Abused, Disadvantaged and Sick Children in Cambodia

6d7636066a59415cb088f26a8020cef4Geraldine Cox always knew she wanted to be a mother but, when she was in her 20s, she found out that she could not have children. She decided to embark on a career with the Australian Department of Foreign Affairs in 1970 where she was posted overseas and saw the hardships and struggles of people in other countries.

Ms. Cox’s first posting was to Phnom Penh, where she experienced life in a country at war when the Vietnam War spilled over into Cambodia. The country left a huge impression on Ms. Cox and, after subsequent postings in Manila, Bangkok, Tehran and Washington, DC, and a stint with The Chase Manhattan Bank in Sydney, Ms. Cox returned to Cambodia in 1996 and co-founded Sunrise Children’s Villages.

Today, Ms. Cox is mum to more than 400 children who live on the premises. Sunrise Children’s Villages is a nonprofit organization that provides education, medical care, and a home for orphaned, abandoned, vulnerable and disadvantaged Cambodian children. Many of the children have HIV or have been shunned by society. Sunrise Children’s Villages offers these children a safe and nurturing environment where the receive care, love and education, as well as explore their individual talents.Ms. Cox now understands why she could have not children of her own. Her destiny was to become a mother to hundreds of children who have nowhere else to turn.

She is the recipient of many Australian awards and was made a Member of the Order of Australia in 2000. Pan Macmillan published her autobiography, “Home Is Where The Heart Is” in 2000 and Hollywood bought the rights to make a feature film based on her book. The documentary on her life, My Khmer Heart, won the 2000 Hollywood Film Festival Documentary of the Year Award and has been screened extensively. Ms. Cox’s story also has been featured on Australian television over the last few years on Australian Story, The Sunday Program, This Is Your Life, Four Corners, Today Tonight, The 7.30 Report and 60 Minutes, Talking Heads and the 7pm Project.

09c4f5acfd2e4ca59f1b19cb03ff0e76Ms. Cox would like to have access to the philanthropy sector, which will give her access to money and religious groups. She currently spends half the year with the children and the the other half traveling to raise funds. She does all the fundraising herself and has raised more than $1 million U.S. per annum to support the work in Cambodia. Ms. Cox wants to continue expanding the orphanage’s reach, and needs funds in order to support the children. She prides herself on not taking no for an answer and being persistence in her search for donors.

From her website:

“When they walk through the Sunrise gates they are suspicious and afraid with no power over their lives. I am just another adult who will hurt them as every adult in their life has done. To watch the fear and trepidation dissolve over ensuing weeks through the love and attention of our staff and the other children is a reward that cannot be expressed. When a distrustful abused child finally finds trust in their heart and limbs into your lap for a cuddle there are no words to express the joy I feel.

As a woman who could never have my own children, to experience the unconditional love of these vulnerable children brings me the joy and contentment in my life that nothing before could satisfy. I know that I am living the life that I was put on earth for and am just annoyed that I had to wait till I was 50 before I got the plot!

While you are reading this, helpless children are being sold into prostitution, slave labor in factories and fishing boats and in the homes of the rich as unpaid housemaids.

When they are old enough to understand we tell them that anything is possible and this has certainly been true for those who are now working and married with their own families in Cambodia. We have graduates in careers as such as dentistry, hospitality, IT, insurance, car and generator maintenance and repair, banking, sales and advertising to name a few. We even have Sunrise graduates studying in Australia who will return to Cambodia and use their degrees to make Cambodia a better place.”

To learn more about Sunrise Children’s Villages and to donate, visit www.scv.org.au. Also visit www.geraldinecox.org and listen to Ms. Cox’s interview on Worldwide Broadcasting here.

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